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The Only All Natural and Holistic Weight Management Program That Works... For Life!

Dealing with Diabetes – Diabetes and Nutrition

Dealing with Diabetes – Diabetes and Nutrition by Dr. Green

In 2007, I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes, my cholesterol was 270 and I was 40 lbs overweight. I began investigating weight loss programs and the science behind them.

They were often geared towards pre-packaged products that did not fit into my family’s lifestyle. More importantly, most of the programs focus on eating just to lose weight. None focused on making the lifestyle change necessary to avoid repeating past dietary mishaps. Insulin is a key factor to weight loss. Recent studies conclusively find that men, women and children that have “belly fat” are targeted for an earlier death than those without this tendency. This even includes individuals that are not overweight! “Belly Fat” is dangerous due to the fact that it poses a

serious risk of disease to the organs it envelops and it is also a clear indicator of high insulin levels. My approach to weight control is an easy, realistic and nutritive way of dining that decreases inflammation in the body by targeting insulin, which results in significant and consistent weight loss. If you are borderline diabetic or have been diagnosed contact Dr. Green for a customized weight program. We encourage you to contact Dr. Green today so that you too can see the benefits of nutrition in your life. Call now to talk to Dr. Green about a health plan for you: 407-207-2306 or email her at info@OI-WM.com.

chickenWhat is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the way our bodies use digested food for growth and energy). The digestive juices break down most of the food we eat into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. After digestion, the glucose passes into our bloodstream where it is available for body cells to use for growth and energy. For the glucose to get into the cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.
When we eat, the pancreas is supposed to automatically produce the right amount of insulin to move the

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glucose from our blood into our cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the body cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.

There are two major types of diabetes mellitus.

In type 1 diabetes, your body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, usually leading to a total failure to produce insulin. It typically starts in children or young adults who are slim, but can start at any age. Without insulin, your body cannot control blood levels of sugar. And without insulin, you would die. So people with type 1 diabetes give themselves at least one shot of insulin every day.

An estimated 500,000 to 1 million Americans have type 2 diabetes today. Type 2 diabetes is non-insulin-dependent. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. It is the most common type of diabetes, it affects about 15 million Americans. Nine out of ten cases of diabetes are type 2. It usually occurs in people over 45 and overweight, among other factors. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin. Or, your body still makes insulin but can’t properly use it. Without enough insulin, your body cannot move blood sugar into the cells. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream. High blood levels of sugar can cause problems.

Dr. Green was diagnosed with Type II diabetes in 2007. After 3 short months on her nutritional program, she was cured. She can do the same for you.

What are the Symptoms?

Symptoms of type 1 Diabetes

  1. High levels of sugar in the blood.
  2. High levels of sugar in the urine.
  3. Frequent urination (and/or bed-wetting in children).
  4. Extreme hunger.
  5. Extreme thirst.
  6. Extreme weight loss.
  7. Weakness and tiredness.
  8. Feeling edgy and having mood changes.
  9. Feeling sick to your stomach and vomiting.

Type 2 diabetes often develops slowly. Most people who get it have increased thirst and an increased need to urinate. Many also feel edgy, tired, and sick to their stomach. Some people have an increased appetite, but they lose weight.

Type 2 is the type of diabetes most people get as adults after the age of 40. But you can get diabetes at a younger age. Healthy eating, exercise, and losing weight may help you lower your blood sugar when you find out you have type two diabetes. If these treatments do not work, you may need one or more types of diabetes pills to lower your blood sugar. After a few more years, you may need to take insulin shots because your body is not making enough insulin. Your pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin. But you body cannot correctly use the insulin you make. You might get this type of diabetes if members of your family have or had diabetes. You might also get type 2 diabetes if you weigh too much or do not exercise enough. After you have had type two diabetes for a few years, your body may stop making enough insulin. Then you will need to take diabetes pills or insulin.

Other signs and symptoms are:

 

  1. Repeated or hard-to-heal infections of the skin, gums, vagina, or bladder.
  2. Blurred vision.
  3. Tingling or loss of feeling in the hands or feet.
  4. Dry, itchy skin.

What are the Risk Factors?

Genetic Risk Factors

A family history of diabetes increases the chance that people will develop diabetes. The San Antonio Heart Study showed that the prevalence of diabetes among people who have first-degree relatives (e.g. parents) with diabetes was twice as great as for Mexican-Americans with no family history of diabetes.
Add mixture with genes of Americans Indians and Africans (populations with high prevalence of diabetes) is also thought to be a factor for higher rates of diabetes in Hispanics. Hispanics, like members of all subpopulations, inherit their susceptibility to diabetes from their ancestors. Hispanics have three groups of ancestors — Spaniards, American Indians, and Africans. Both American Indians and Africans have high rates of diabetes.

Although Cuban Americans have both American Indian and African ancestry, neither of these genetic roots contributes more than 20 percent to the current Cuban American gene pool. This fact may explain why Cuban Americans have a higher prevalence of Type 2 diabetes than non-Hispanic white Americans, yet not as high as the other Hispanic groups.

Medical Risk Factors

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

One of the best predictors — or risk factors — of Type 2 diabetes is impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). People with IGT have higher-than-normal blood glucose levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. Most experts believe that IGT is an early stage in the natural history of diabetes. As with Type 2 diabetes, IGT is very prevalent among Hispanic Americans.

Obesity

Obesity is a major risk factor for Type 2 diabetes, and Hispanics are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to be overweight. It is known that the prevalence of obesity is higher in Mexican-Americans and they are known to be two to four times more likely to have Type 2 diabetes than non-Hispanic white Americans of similar weight. Figure 2 compares the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes between Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic whites by the level of obesity.
The degree to which obesity is a risk factor for diabetes depends not just on overall weight, but also on the location of the excess weight. Central or upper body, obesity is a greater risk factor for Type 2 diabetes, compared to excess weight carried below the waist. Mexican-Americans with upper body obesity have increased risk of Type 2 diabetes.

My Story

Cindy Gulledge is a teacher with diabetes. Her doctor significantly increased her medications after her eating habits changed over the summer causing her blood sugar to range between 130-150. Dr. Green’s program of Nutrition and Exercise reduced not only her blood sugar, but cholesterol, triglycerides, she lost weight, 5 inches from her waist, she has more energy and her way to a size 10!!! Stay tuned for update. It’s your turn! Contact Dr. Green at 407-207-2306 today!!!

How is Diabetes Treated?

One of the most important things you can do is maintain a clear and direct communication between a primary care provider. Your doctor will be able to help you the most. This is important because they will be able to determine your level of illness. Treatment consists of taking medication by mouth or injecting insulin, controlling food intake, testing urine or blood daily, and exercising daily. Diabetics must also inspect their skin and feet, have yearly eye examinations, and learn to recognize signs of high and low blood pressure.
Most people make insulin in their pancreas. If you have type one diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Insulin helps sugar from the foods you eat get to all parts of your body to use for energy. Because your body no longer makes insulin, you need

to take insulin in shots. Take your insulin as your doctor tells you.

Type 2 is the type of diabetes most people get as adults after the age of 40. But you can get diabetes at a younger age. Healthy eating, exercise, and losing weight may help you lower your blood sugar when you find out you have type two diabetes. If these treatments do not work, you may need one or more types of diabetes pills to lower your blood sugar. After a few more years, you may need to take insulin shots because your body is not making enough insulin. Your pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin. But you body cannot correctly use the insulin you make. You might get this type of diabetes if members of your family have or had diabetes. You might also get type 2 diabetes if you weigh too much or do not exercise enough. After you have had type two diabetes for a few years, your body may stop making enough insulin. Then you will need to take diabetes pills or insulin.

There are four things you have to do everyday if you have diabetes: eat healthy food, get regular exercise, take your diabetes medicine, and test your blood sugar. Experts say most people with diabetes should try to keep their blood sugar level as close as possible to the level of someone who does not have diabetes. This may not be possible or right for everyone. Check with your doctor about the right range of blood sugar for you.

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Diabetics should eat plenty of lean protein, such as turkey, chicken, and fish, and several cups of green leafy low glycemic index vegetables every day. People with diabetes do not need special foods. The foods on your diabetes-eating plan are the same foods that are good for everyone in your family. Try to eat foods that are low in fat, salt, and sugar. Eating right will help you reach and stay at a weight that is good for your body, keep your blood sugar in a good range, and prevent heart and blood vessel disease. Your daily eating plan should include foods from these groups: meat, chicken or other poultry like fish, beans, eggs and vegetables. People with diabetes should have their own eating plan. Ask your doctor to give you the name of a dietitian who can work with you to develop an eating plan for you and your family. Your dietitian can help you plan meals to include foods that you and your family like to eat and that are good for you.

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If you use insulin, give yourself an insulin shot before you eat. Also, eat at about the same time and the same amount of food every day. Don’t skip meals, especially if you have already given yourself an insulin shot because your blood sugar may go too low. If you don’t use insulin, follow your meal plan. Don’t skip meals, especially if you take diabetes pills, because your blood sugar may go too low. Skipping a meal can make you eat too much at the next meal. It may be better to eat several small meals during the day instead of one or two big meals.

Exercise is good for your diabetes. Walking, swimming, dancing, riding a bicycle, playing baseball, and bowling are all good ways to exercise. You can even get exercise when you clean house or work in your garden. Exercise is especially good for people with diabetes because exercise helps keep weight down, helps insulin work better to lower blood sugar, keeps your heart and lungs in good condition, and gives you more energy. Before you begin exercising, talk with your doctor. Your doctor may check your heart and your feet to be sure you have no special problems. If you have high blood pressure or eye problems, some exercises like weight lifting may not be safe. Your doctor or nurse will help you find safe exercises. Try to exercise regularly. Exercise at least three times a week for about 30 to 45 minutes each time. If you have not exercised in a while, begin slowly. Start with 5 to 10 minutes and then work up to more time. If you haven’t eaten for over an hour or if your blood sugar is less than 100-120, eat or drink something like an apple or a glass of milk before you exercise. When you exercise, carry a snack with you in case of low blood sugar. Wear or carry an identification tag or card saying that you have diabetes.

Along with all the healthy eating and exercise you must take your medication and also test your blood sugar everyday. It is also very important to take good records so you and your doctor can see your progress.

 

 

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